The Myth of the Twenty-First Century, or Never Mind the Bollocks, All Your Money is Worthless!

Welcome to the cult of perpetual madness.

Welcome to the cult of perpetual madness, where the Kool Aid drinkers worship at the altar of Recession.

by Lexander Magazine Editorial Staff

As the global news media, banking institutions and their financial charlatans masquerading as “professional economists” begin to beat the doom-and-gloom drum of “recession” and “austerity” and “inevitable monetary collapse,” we thought we’d repeat something that needs to be repeated every second of every day until people finally wake up and realize they’ve been conned. It isn’t that most people don’t realize they’ve been conned, and conned royally. Human stupidity is certainly infinite, without a doubt. However, there are enough intelligent, rational and no-nonsense humans out there to keep things from completely and irreversibly falling apart. The rest need a daily reality check, if they can get their brains unglued from their banal entertainments enough to think an actual thought or two.

Here is the cold, hard reality of the global economy: there is no such as “recession.” The idea that “recession” exists, let alone possible, has been one of the greatest scams perpetuated on the human race since the invention of tax collection agencies.

re·ces·sion
riˈseSHən/
noun
noun: recession; plural noun: recessions
  1. 1.
    a period of temporary economic decline during which trade and industrial activity are reduced, generally identified by a fall in GDP in two successive quarters.
    Origin
    mid 17th cent.: from Latin recessio(n-), from recess- ‘gone back,’ from the verbrecedere (see recede).

So-called “recession is not possible in reality due to the fact that labour and production do not actually recede, but are instead deliberately reduced and slashed by the arbiters of international capital. Everybody knows this. Everybody knows recessions are artificially induced. Everybody knows workers are expendable and are viewed and treated as mere cattle by the puppetmasters operating behind the scenes.

But what most do not necessarily know or at least are unable to properly understand is the fact that all modern currency is fiat. This means that all paper money is essentially worthless, as it is valid only so long as the government is willing to support it. But its real value is zero—walk into any bank, anywhere in the world, and try to exchange a US dollar bill or euro for a precious metal like gold or silver and you will be laughed at and ridiculed.

In ancient times, money was produced in the form of coins using precious metals like gold, silver, bronze and copper. Gold coins, of course, have always been considered to most valuable. Paper currencies are more recent in origin and had never been intended to replace precious metals or other commodities of value, but rather to help establish and facilitate a safer, more efficient way of transferring money from one person or institution to another. By the twentieth century, however, governments, large conglomerates, robber barons, elite bankers, and investment firms had realised that the extremely limited quantities and reserves of precious metals, the increasing sociopolitical awareness and rebellions of the working classes and peasantry and the ever more rapid collapse of the Old Order necessitated a radical and fundamental change to maintain the hegemony of the few over the economic slavery of the many.

Adam Smith’s economic theories which led to the extinction of mercantilism and feudalism and the progressive transition toward capitalism, which directly fueled the establishment of the middle classes who began slowly away more and more of the wealth of the aristocracy and nobility was bad enough as it was at the time, but then Karl Marx came along and expanded upon Smith’s theories and developed a much more comprehensive and radical theory of economy that he and Frederick Engles termed scientific socialismand which has since been generally referred to as Marxism—and which created countless additional problems and headaches for the hegemonic elites of hereditary wealth.

To make a long story short, two bloody and nearly apocalyptic world wars were instigated and waged as a result of this class warfare, and in the aftermath of World War II, dozens of new classes had arisen, with the entire planet divided almost perfectly between the corporate-dominated sphere of exploitation (so-called “Western capitalism,” a flagrant oxymoron) and the state-dominated sphere of exploitation (so-called “Eastern Communism,” equally as absurd an oxymoron).

Under both corporate-dominated economies and state command economies, both realised the existence of a number of deeply flawed contradictions and errors that could potentially plunge them both into extinction if not corrected. This was the realisation that no matter what economic system was formed, no matter how “brilliant” or clever one’s economic planners happened to be, there was no escaping the fact that ultimately all wealth was tied to the strength and extent of human labour. This meant that even precious metals, as valuable as people have always perceived them, were intrinsically worthless if they were unable to be backed by the labour of the commoners. Forced slavery, as had been practiced for centuries in Europe and by New World colonialists had long since been abandoned as a viable form of economy due to increasing civil disgust and the enshrinement of human rights in modern constitutions.

Slavery in the classic form, of course, never disappeared but has been supplanted in many parts of the world with wage slavery (“living paycheck to paycheck,” unable to ever save a dime or even have a chance at the so-called “good life”), with the Salafist regimes of the Arabian world (Saudi Arabia, Qatar and United Arab Emirates being the worst and most bloody offenders) and certain sub-Saharan African societies still practicing premodern slavery.

But again, to make a long story short, the value of any form of currency or commodity is ultimately to that of human labour: farmers are needed for the domestication and upkeep of animals for food as well as the development and maintenance of agricultural products, scientists are needed to develop new theories while engineers are needed to figure out ways to put those theories into practice, and so on.

The equation is simple: Money is worthless, now more than ever, while labour is invaluable. The only reason the modern absurdity of “recession” becomes possible is when those in the centres of power deliberately cut down on the amount of labour in order to avoid the attainment surplus. To the wealthiest and most powerful of wealth hoarders and authoritarians, surplus is death. There is nothing worse to the oppressor and overseer as surplus wealth and labour. Under the current paradigm, which has persisted for many thousands of centuries, wealth is tied to supply and demand, and specifically the amount of supply in relation to the level of demand. Thus, the less supply there is to fulfill increasingly higher levels of demand, the wealthier those in control of the supply become.

While this is all basic economics, and one need only study Adam Smith and Karl Marx to come to a full understanding of how the world functions economically, too many remain ignorant and freak out when the merchants of doom proclaim yet another “recession” for the umpteenth time.

This is why we don’t like stock markets and avoid them like the plague. More and more companies, even large multinationals are beginning to realise just how hopelessly pernicious and destructive stock exchanges really are. Even worse, the wealth generated by public exchanges and commodities markets are not directly tied to labour value, but speculation and hoarding of commodities. But human resources are needed to provide labour and grow and maintain commodities. No human resources or labour, and no amount of precious metals, agricultural goods, oil, gold, or any other such commodity will have any value. From the simple fact of needing to drill and refine oil, transport produce, store and secure precious metals, and so on, without the labour class, there is nothing.

Here then, is the sole and most accurate definition of value: labour. Nothing will ever change this. This is how it has always been and how it will always be. A few on the lunatic fringes of futurism and transhumanism can dream about the day when slave robots will do all our labour for us so we can sit around and twiddle our thumbs and keep our heads rooted deeply in the sand, but fortunately, reality cannot be shortchanged nor are most humans gullible enough to accept such utopian (or dystopian, depending on your view) fantasies.

Thus, it is more imperative today than ever to cultivate a society in which small businesses can grow and thrive, without having to constantly fend off the state-sponsored terrorism of tax collectors at the local, country, state/provincial, and federal levels. Small businesses and individual labourers are the future of the global economy. The monstrous corporate behemoths are already clearly headed towards the extinction they so richly deserve, as with the increasingly authoritarian and massive state bureaucracies that are imploding from within.

The examples of visionary leaders such as Vannevar Bush, Steve Jobs, and most recently Brendan Eich reveals the flawed paradigm of the public and collectivist model of organization and its inferiority in the face of the single-minded vision of the leadership principle that allows any organisation—even collectivist organizations—to grow and thrive in the first place. When the founders and productive leaders of their own organisations are forced out by the violent bigotry of the mob that they allowed in the first place, well … we don’t have to tell you that this is the sign of a collectivist mob society well on its way toward self-destruction through implosion and collapse from within. If the West falls, it will not be due to foreign invaders or terrorists. It will be because of our own infinite stupidity, ignorance, arrogance, and willingness to accommodate and support state and corporate oppression against ourselves.

Just as it has been said that charity begins at the home, among one’s own family and friends, sanity begins at the local level. The nation-state, the collectivist tyranny at the national level, has, like the national and multinational conglomerates that prop them up, long since outlived its usefulness.

It’s time for a change.

 

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